Testing Sites, Isolation, and Home Care

Call 911 or go to an emergency room if you are having a medical emergency. Tell the 911 dispatcher your symptoms. For COVID-19, a medical emergency means severe respiratory symptoms such as increased shortness of breath or breathing difficulties. Only go to an emergency room if you are having a medical emergency, not to be tested.

Anyone with symptoms like cough, fever, or other respiratory problems should call their healthcare provider for guidance and separate themselves from others. A doctor’s order for testing is required for some sites but not others. This information is noted for each site. You can also get text messages with more information about support available by reporting your symptoms to the state’s symptom tracker. Get more information on the state’s COVID-19 testing webpage.

Should I get tested?

If you have insurance, call or email your healthcare provider, or a telehealth line or nurseline, to get their advice before going to any health facility. Ask about private lab sites where you can get tested. The CovidLine is a free hotline for COVID-19 screening and telehealth service for Adams, Arapahoe, and Douglas County residents who may not have insurance. CovidLine Telephone Hotline:

  • Local: 720-902-9449
  • Toll-free: 1-855-963-3721

You can also visit the online Symptom Tracker from the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment. If you provide your phone number, you can receive text messages that check on you and your condition, point you towards resources to help you manage your symptoms, help you access medical care and services, and give you information about how to get tested if necessary.  

Where can I get tested?

Call your health care provider before going to the clinic or hospital to be tested. Currently, Tri-County Health Department does not test or directly collect samples for testing. Your healthcare provider may send you to a place that has testing available. Most testing sites require a referral and to schedule an appointment ahead of time. Check the details of each testing site online for the most up-to-date information. 

Testing locations in Douglas County are also available on the county’s site for COVID-19 Testing Locations.

Community Health Centers 

These clinics accept patients regardless of insurance status. Many are currently accepting new patients.

Private provider testing for the public

The following private providers have indicated that they are able to provide COVID-19 testing. For more information, please contact these companies directly. Because they are private providers and not operated by the State of Colorado, neither the state nor the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment is responsible for the information about or operations of these testing sites:


Find additional private provider testing on the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment’s
Testing for COVID-19 webpage.

How much do tests cost?

Self-isolate fact sheetWhat are the next steps after being tested? 

The clinic that did your testing will get the results to you. If you were symptomatic when you were tested you will need to self-isolate until:

  • You have had no fever for at least 3 days without using fever-reducing medication; AND
  •  Your symptoms have greatly improved for at least 3 days; AND

  • At least 10 days have passed since your symptoms first appeared. If after 10 days, fever is still present OR respiratory symptoms are not better, then stay home until those symptoms have improved for at least 3 days.

If you tested positive, and have completed self isolation, you should still follow Safer at Home guidelines. As you start to return to public places, you should still wear a mask, practice social distancing, and wash your hands frequently. At this time, it is not yet understood how long you may have immunity to COVID-19 after you have tested positive. It is best to follow prevention methods to ensure you do not get COVID-19 again.

The possibility of having a contagious illness is scary, but doctors, nurses, researchers, and public health officials are learning more about COVID-19 every day. They are working together with national and international agencies to identify and provide care to patients while avoiding the spread of the illness in the community. Continue to listen to your body and take care of yourself. Get plenty of rest, fluids, healthy meals and snacks, relaxation time, and support from loved ones.

En español: Cuando este ENFERMO con síntomas de COVID-19, AÍSLESE para no estar en contacto con otros.

Home care advice for COVID-19 Opens in new window

How can I safely care for someone who has been tested positive?

If you or a loved one test positive for COVID-19, know what protective steps to take if you are sick or caring for someone who is sick. Everyone in the house can help reduce the spread by:

  • Being in separate areas of your house
  • Washing hands often
  • Avoid touching eyes, nose and mouth with unwashed hands
  • Covering your sneezes and coughs
  • Wearing a facemask in your house
  • Cleaning commonly touched surfaces every day
  • Avoid sharing household items
  • Calling ahead before visiting a doctor

Read more about these preventive measures on our Home Care Advice for COVID-19 fact sheet. En español: Consejos para el cuidado en el hogar para COVID-19

What if my results were negative?

If you test negative for COVID-19, you probably were not infected at the time your sample was collected. However, that does not mean you will not get sick. It is possible that you were very early in your infection when your sample was collected and that you could test positive later. Additionally, you could be exposed later and then develop symptoms. Or you might be infected with a different respiratory illness, continue to self-isolate at home until:

  • You have had no fever for at least 3 days without using fever-reducing medication; AND
  •  Your symptoms have greatly improved for at least 3 days; AND

  • At least 10 days have passed since your symptoms first appeared. If after 10 days, fever is still present OR respiratory symptoms are not better, then stay home until those symptoms have improved for at least 3 days.

Call your healthcare provider if your symptoms get worse or you develop new symptoms.

What about antibody/serologic testing?

Use caution when deciding to get tested for COVID-19 antibodies. The tests being marketed vary greatly in quality and accuracy and it is difficult for the public to determine which tests are better. The FDA is conducting research studies with the CDC and NIH to evaluate certain antibody tests and those results have not been released.

At this time, antibody tests should not be used to diagnosis acute [current] COVID-19 infection. Having a positive antibody test does not necessarily mean that you have immune protection against infection. Regardless of an antibody test result, follow the same guidelines for protecting yourself against COVID-19 and follow stay-at-home instructions if you have COVID-19 symptoms.

Beware of emails and posts selling antibody tests. There are multiple unscrupulous companies trying to mislead the public with misinformation. At this time, the FDA has not authorized any COVID-19 test to be completely used and processed at home.

Additional testing resources and information